Roasted Marrow Bones with Pickled Shallots

roasted marrow bone plate

Serves approximately 4

Ingredients

6 shallots, trimmed, quartered lengthwise with some root attached

1 cup of champagne vinegar

1 cup sugar

1 teaspoon coriander seeds

1 teaspoon fennel seeds

1 teaspoon pink peppercorns

1 dried bay leaf (preferably Turkish)

1 dried chile de arbol

4 to 5 marrow bones

¼ cup parsley, roughly chopped

¼ of a lemon, sliced

flaky salt, such as Maldon’s

8 or more fresh slices of baguette, preferably homemade, toasted

 

For the Pickled Shallots

Combine the first 8 ingredients in a medium saucepan.  Bring to boil, stirring to dissolve sugar.  Remove from heat and let cool for about 30 minutes.  Once cool, slice the shallots into julienne and place in a bowl with some of the pickling juice.

 

For the Marrow Bones

Preheat the oven or toaster oven for 450°.  Line a rimmed sheet pan with foil.  Stand the marrow bone upright with the widest end of the bone on the bottom.  Roast for 15-20 minutes.

Scoop out the marrow onto toasted baguette.  Sprinkle with flaky salt, lightly dress with lemon and top with  pickled shallots and parsley.

 

 

7 thoughts on “Roasted Marrow Bones with Pickled Shallots

  1. Hello, I really enjoyed reading your articles. I came across your blog while searching for some reviews about the school Gastronomicon. I am considering a career change from business into culinary and I was wondering if you can help shed some light on some things for me. I don’t have any professional cooking experience behind me, just the regular home cooking which I thoroughly enjoy. Does Gastronomicon teaches basic foundations of cooking, theories and culinary techniques? Or does it just teaches you a few French dishes? I thought 3 hours of cooking per day may be a little short to really understand cooking. I would really appreciate your insight on this. I’m just doing some research before jumping into this investment. Thank you!! 🙂

  2. Hello, I really enjoyed reading your articles. I came across your blog while searching for reviews for the school Gastronomicom. I am considering a career change from business to culinary and I was wondering if you could shed some light on some things for me based on your experience. I don’t have any professional cooking experience behind me, just the regular home cooking which I thoroughly enjoyed. Does Gastronomicom provide the basic foundation, theories and culinary techniques in cooking? Or do they just teach you how to prepare a few French dishes? I thought that 3 hours of cooking per day might not be enough to fully teach all the foundations and techniques. I would really appreciate any insights you can share on this. I am just doing my research before jumping into this investment. Thank you!! 🙂

    • Hi Carmela, I’m not sure exactly what you are looking for, but from what I read of your comment you (like me) would like to be shown more theory and culinary techniques (as well as some science behind what’s happening?). In that case I would not recommend so much Gastronomicom. You may want to check out schools more like Cordon Bleu or Culinary Institute of America (which I like). There is another option that is less professional, but longer hours than Gastronomicom in Ireland which I’ve attended called The Ballymaloe Cookery School. That 3 month course is also on this website. It’s all a matter of what you’re looking for. You want professional, go…and pay for professional. If you want to improve your skills a bit, have fun and learn some new things, then go with a second tier school. Hope this helps! Good luck, great adventures await you!! Cheers!

  3. Thank you !! This has definitely shed some light 🙂 And as to what I’m looking for, well I really want to get a cook job in a restaurant in Vancouver or a different country after this course. I am looking at Gastronomicom’s full program which includes a 4 months internship program in a hotel. I thought that the first 3 months will be spent learning and applying the basic foundations then the 4 months internship would be to hone my culinary skills. I thought that the full program is aimed to those who want to be a professional cook. I’m still in Vancouver right now doing research and I am also going to do some volunteer work in community kitchens to learn. I would really like to go back to France and complete my studies there but my budget is just around the tuition of Gastronomicom. I’ve looked at Cordon Bleu and CIA but both are very pricey for me. Ballymaloe looks good and has more information available in their website but it is still out of my budget. Thanks again for your advice!! If you have any more please send them my way. 🙂 Happy cooking !!

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